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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 175 (some duplicates have been removed)
way and mild way and raise the minimum wage that it has a positive effect on the local economy. positive effects in terms of lower training costs and turnover and less lost time at work and dedicated employees, so small businesses, mid size and large businesses benefit from in, as well as local government because they don't have as many people relying on social services. so, the data doesn't back that up. in fact, it's a positive thing he when we do it in a planful fashion to raise the minimum wage. >> on this issue, just like an economist. on the one hand, on the other hand, there are studies on both sides. but jonas there is an argument that higher minimum wages reducing turnover, which lessens the costs of employers and could increase employments. >> you would never leave the job if you could get it, it's a pretty good wage. negatives and benefits. both sides of kind of right. if the minimum wage is low $2, it wouldn't disrupt the job market. if it's $50, high unemployment, but a-- there's obviously a level between there where the negatives would exceed the positives. there
for the economy in the long run. >> the interesting point about jobbings. unions want the pipe lines. >> of course thape do. >> the members saying we want the jobs here. there is it an irony to what the protestors are all about. they don't want the pipe line because it will unwind autoefficiency standards and we have electric fired from energy from coal that really pollute. >> i don't believe rick's protestations that the democrats want all of the above. our governor in new york state doesn't like nuclear and like fraking but he is not interested in turning down his air conditioner. >> the president will have to choose between the environmentalist who are protesting loudly and on the other side the union guys who want the jobs, who should he choose? >> he should choose union and he will go to the environmentam. he believes it is bad. >> rick, not only has he said that past. but mr. c, had u said that. >> when did they say it a bad thing. >> they are the carbon. >> he has a dinosaur that oil is a thing . past. always expect the unexpect would. >> last word from mr. forbes. forget the smoking dream
a renaissance may be at hand for the u.s. economy? find out right now on "your money." >>> despite a recession in europe, major mergers in the united states show evidence that business is picking up. america could be on the road to prosperity if not for our politicians standing on the way. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." there's ap economic storm hovering just off our shores. the headwinds are gathering strength as our elected official once again seem prepared to take the american economy to the brink of destruction. this time over a march 1st deadline for the across-the-board government cuts known as the sequester. >> this is not a game. this is reality. >> i don't like the sequester. it's taking a meat axe to our government. >> these steps would seriously damage the fragile american economy. >> still fragile enough that four years after the recession the u.s. economy actually shrank in the last three months of 2012. the storm clouds were ready to blow away and washington basically called them back. >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. >> if not for indeci
around, stock market near all-time highs, housing market recovering and the economy adding jobs every month. now relief may have given way to a little bit of worry. here's why. it's starting to feel like a recession again, especially if you're living paycheck to paycheck, gas prices up nearly 50 cents in the past month. the fastest run-up, you're bringing homeless money, thanks to the expiration of the tax cut. you're getting about 60 bucks less every month. rents are rising, up 12 quarters in a row now. unemployment is still too high. if you were counting on an early tax refupd you have had to wait. because of the fiscal cliff fiasco, the irs did not start issuing refund checks until january 30th. a stretched consumer, a consumer who has no choice but to cut back. big companies you work for say this is already happening. this week, walmart, the proxy for the american consumer says february sales were slow. why? it blamed gas prices, the end of the payroll tax holiday and those delayed tax refunds. that's what we know. washington to the rescue? of course not. on friday comes austerity
be quote as necessary to defense as it is to the national economy and the personal safety. as president, eisenhower set out to gather national support complete with a made-for-tv style campaign ad. >> in this century, america has become a nation on wheels. we ride on wheels to work, to shop, to play, to go about any place we want to go. we depend on wheels to bring us the food we eat and the clothes we wear and the things that we use, but when we depend on wheels, we depend also on highways. >> but of course, as all things in washington tend to go, the 34th president struggled with the lack of consensus. governors, democrat and republican, fought eisenhower e on with what they called his plan for the biggest federal aid programs, calling the republican president to task for running away from his staunch opposition to federal encroachment on state sovereignty. it was in fact the democratic senator from virginia, harry byrd, who tried to block eisenhower's plan, and byrd was known as a pay as you go man, and he had a wild hatred for debt. after a lot of coalition building president dwight
with iran to discuss its nuclear program and iran's economy has been severely damaged by international sanctions the past several months, but iran remains defiant and israel and other middle eastern countries continue to push for a military strike on iran's nuclear facilities, but kelly, many western and military analysts say a military strike would probably not be completely effective and cut back iran's nuclear am billingses by a few years, kelly. >> connor powell, by the way, how does the world need to react to iran's mixed messages, the former ambassador to the united nations john bolton joins us to weigh in. >> the family of olympic athlete oscar pistorius is speaking out. he's charged with premeditated murder in the shooting death of his girlfriend reeva steenkamp. speaking to reporters today his uncle says that pistorius is numb with shock and grief. >> as you can imagine our entire family is devastated. we are in a state of total shock. reeva, who have got to know well and cared for deeply. after consulting with our legal representatives, we deeply regret the allegations of pre
to "the ed show" from new york. the republicans' presidents' day sale on the economy a total bust. tonight the truth on our spending problem. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> there you go. good job. >> four years after the stimulus saved us from depression, republicans are dragging us into recession. >> spending is the problem. >> tonight the facts versus republican fantasy on the economy and the sequester. >> we have had a massive cover-up on the part -- >> but a massive cover-up of what? >> john mccain is at it again. >> do you care whether four americans died? >> retired colonel lawrence wilkerson on the blind republican rage over benghazi. >>> the luv gov is hitting the trail again. >> i'm a bottom line kind of guy. it's going to hurt. >> we'll show you his questionable ad. >>> plus, marco rubio disagrees with his own immigration plan because the president likes it. >>> mississippi finally got around to banning slavery this month. >>> and the oscar-nominated movie "silver linings playbook" is shining new light on treating mental illness. director david o. russell joins me t
/bowles a serious plan. tonight i'll expose how it's seriously going to kill the economy. liberals, hold your ground. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their job because you want to protect some special interest tax loophole? >> the president takes his case to the people as the two salesmen for republican austerity are mobbed by protesters. >> pay your share of taxes. >> pay your tax. >> tonight, "time's" michael grunwald, jonathan alter and katrina vanden heuvel on how to dismantle the austerity bomb. >> 10,000 bucks? >>> the godfather of the conservative movement offers romney pocket change to anyone who can save the republican party. i'll show you why it's a lost cause. >>> plus, a virginia pizza shop owner uses a sick promotion to sell pies and push the nra agenda. >>> the beltway press takes their eye off the ball, complaining about bohm and tiger woods. the least popular senator is desperately attacking ashley judd. and david corn, the co-author of "hubris" and co-author of the msnbc documentary tells me what was left out. >> i
right. the cuts are not smart. they're not fair. they're going to hurt the economy. but what the president didn't mention, that the sequester, that was his idea in the first place. >> not smart, not fair. it was his idea? let's keep adding it up, boys. today john boehner fired off his latest shot in this blame game. he took to the pages of the "wall street journal" to accuse the president of the united states of creating a financial crisis. boehner said the president's sequester is now eminent. but the daily beast website released some information today to knock down boehner's accusations. you see, back in 2011, boehner's office developed a power point presentation for house republicans. it was a two-step approach, but it actually contained three steps. first of all, no tax hikes. of course that's typical. spending cuts extending the debt ceiling increase, and spending caps. but while pushing those spending caps, boehner did what? he highlighted a special trigger mechanism -- sequestration. boehner was selling this idea to his caucus as a good way to make sure that they were
that massive layoffs could cripple their economies. >> we don't need to wait to see the white in the eyes before we start responding because of the potential that we see. this challenge is real and real right now. >> reporter: well, with the deadline still nine days away, there's still a lot of posturing, and there's no sign that anyone's trying to make a deal. administration tells us that there are no secret talks or negotiations under way. the reason for that, of course, the obama administration thinks it's winning this debate and republican pressure will force republicans to give in. charlie, gayle? >> thanks. >>> cbs political correspondent john dickerson. good morning, john. >> good morning, charlie. >> put this for us in terms of what we're talking about and what we're not talking about. >> it's a good point. step back here. what we're not talking about in this sequester is the actual long-term drivers of this deficit problem so as people look at the fight, which is the 900th chap tur in the con stangt fights of the budget, what's happening is the debate about dumb cuts to a portion
entire economy at risk just to protect a few special interest tax loopholes that benefit the wealthiest individuals and corporations. that's the choice. are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their jobs because you want to protect a special interest tax loophole? are you willing to have teachers laid off or kids not have access to head start? or deeper cuts in student loan programs? just because you want to protect a special tax interest loophole that the vast majority of americans don't benefit from. that's the choice. that's the question. and this is not an abstraction. there are people who's livelihoods are at stake, there are communities that are going to be impacted in a negative way. and i know that sometimes all this squabbling in washington seems very abstract. and in the abstract, people like the idea, you know, there must be some spending we can cut. there must be some waste out there absolutely is. but this isn't the right way to do it. so my door is open. i put tough cuts and reforms on the table. i am willing to work with anybody to get this job done. none
: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for small business. get a shareable pool of data... got enough joshua trees? ... on up to 25 devices. so you can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. >> chris: this week he took on democrats and republicans in his tea party response to the president's state of the union address. here are with his critique of both parties is senator rand paul of kentucky. welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning. >> chris: we will get to the president in a moment. let's start with the republicans. you say the sequester is fine, even the 40 plus billion dollars that the pentagon would take in military spending cu
the sequester is not higher taxes or just better spending control. it's by creating jobs, growing the economy and expanding the tax base. >> president obama will be taking his message on the road next week to a virginia shipbuilding operation. virginia, with its massive defense industry, would be hit hard by the spending cuts. arthel. >> molly henneberg live from washington. thanks. >> as the u.s. faces its own economic problem, britain's economy is facing a serious new setback. moody's, the credit rating agency, announced the first ever downgrade of the u.k.'s pristine credit rating by a notch, blaming weak growth and political turmoil for throwing its deficit reduction plan off course. david ram con says he has full confidence in his finance minister, george osborne, despite criticism that their debt strategy is failing to deliver, britain now joining the u.s. and france in having lost its triple a rating from at least one major agency. >>> serious new concerns out of iran asment country's powerful revolutionary guard begins new military exercises, at the same time iranian scientists announ
shrinks the deficit dpaster than a growing economy that creates good, middle class jobs. that should be our driving focus, making america a magnet for good jobs, ewinning how people with the skills required to fill those jobs. making sure their hard work leads to a decent living. those are the things we should be pushing ourselves to think about and work on every single day. that's what american people expect. that's what i'm going to work on every single day to help deliver. so i need everybody who's watches today to understand, we've got a few days, congress can do the right thing, we can avert just one more washington manufactured problem that slows our recovery and bring down our deficits in a balanced with, responsible way. that's my goal, that's what would do right by these first respond irs, that's what would do right by america's middle class. that's what i'm going to be working on and fighting for not just over the next few weeks, but over the next few years. thanks very much, everybody. thank you guys for your service. >> the president speak once again, restates his positio
we all lived when the floor fell out of the 2008 economy. that was the detroit represented by the three big auto manufacturers whose failure would have symbolized to many of us the very failure of america, and that detroit as the obama for america campaign reminded us repeatedly, is now very much alive and kicking. but that detroit, the detroit we all want to see survive, exists in the entire country, not within any specific municipal bounds. then there is the literal detroit, the one where people live, the renaissance city founded initially in 1701. once it was a hub for mechanical manufacturing and detroit in the mid 20th century was a magnet for those looking for work. the city's population grew to more than 1.8 million residents in the 1950s. today, according to the latest census, detroit is the only -- the country's 18th largest city with just more than 700,000 inhabitants, for a city that covers almost 139 square miles. a space that san francisco, boston and manhattan could fit in with room to spare. there are so many factors contributing to the city's financial distr
to slow the rate of growth on a per capital ya basis to the rate of growth of the economy. in our opinion, that takes about $600 billion to do over a ten-year period. and it does such things as paying for incentives go to pay for quality rather than quantity. it has real cost sharing in there. it happens has mean testing. it has appropriate saving in there in order to take account of, you know, the aging of the population. >> not premium support or vouchers? >> no. we don't think that's something you have to go to in addition to slow the rate of growth to the rate of growth on the economy on a per capital basis. >> simon. >> i just wonder what you and your guests think about whether the ground is shifting on actually getting a deal, on getting something into law. in 45 minutes' time, president obama is going to attempt to pitch the jobs for firefighters over the sequester against further taxing of the rich. he clearly feels that he has greater political freedom in his second term. he has this huge organization attempt to go mobilize outside the beltway and the gop seems very divided. is t
the economy and jobs. there is, obviously, debate how many jobs have been created in the economy. look. you pointed out to apple tim cook in the audience in the state of the union and sitting on over $171 million in cash at apple. why? because uncertainty in the marketplace. tom friedman writing this morning something that caught my eye. he said you can feel the economy wants to launch but washington is sitting on the national mute button. we the people feel like the children of permanently divorcing parents. >> how does this sequester business end? the president said during the campaign the sequester, the word for automatic spending cuts, he said it would not happen. is it going to happen? >> i always read tom friedman has the good minnesota sensibility. the column today i think is continuation of that. frankly i believe a continuation of exactly the plan the president laid out in detail in the state of the union on tuesday night. we have already made 2.5 trillion dollars in deficit reduction efforts. we are going to -- we're ready as the president said in a very detailed way to make anoth
laid out for republicans. it's not just the economy that will suffer from the looming cuts next week. that's march 1st. national security will as well and it's seriously at risk. >> already the threat of these cuts has forced the navy to delay an aircraft carrier that was supposed to deploy to the persian gulf, and as our military leaders have made clear, changes like this, not well thought through, not phased in properly, changes like this affect our ability to respond to threats in unstable parts of the world. >> governor rendell, i just wonder what you think would be the situation, the scenario, if it comes to this. we pick up our paper some day and the newspaper said, carrier group can't make it to persian gulf for lack of funding. i mean, i just wonder if we're ready to face something -- i don't think we ever faced that in world war ii, in korea, in vietnam. we're unable to fight the wars we're in. >> chris, overall it's an incredibly bad situation for the country, and we can argue over who deserves the blame for this, and there's probably blame to go around, but right now the r
with. >> he's not alone. >> our economy is adding jobs but too many people still can't find full-time employment. >> when president obama took office, 134 million americans were working in nonfarm jobs. today, after massive losses and a slow recovery, we're only 1.2 million jobs better off. and many pay less than those that were lost. recent study by the center for college affordability found almost half of college graduates are now in jobs that do not require four-year degrees. things like janitorial services, taxi driving and retail sales. professor richard vetter at ohio university helped author that study. >> let's say each one of them were making $20,000 a year more in income, which is quite plausible. we are talking about $400 billion a year in lost wages. >>> numbers like that made some economic analysts argue that underemployment may be every bit as damaging to the economy as unemployment. and kellock irvin is caught in the middle of it all. for now he takes freelance jobs as a photographer and part-time work with moving companies. but -- >> that can only support me so lo
's get a look at the big picture and how gasoline prices could affect the economy. >> the economic model, gasoline prices, one of the troubles facing consumers in the early part of this year. let's put some numbers on it. $10 a barrel increase is negative 0.2. it's double, that's where it comes from the decline in spending and hit to consumers' pockets and half the impact on total investment according to eia. more to the energy bill and gasoline. consumer pay for both energy commodities, gasoline and diesel and energy services, electricity and natural gas. the gas part, that's the part that's been going up, the biggest part. the smaller piece, the utilities, they have been dock down. that's something of an offset, why the worst case scenarios courtney spun out may not come true. add up uncertainties, high gasoline prices, sequester, payroll taxes, security, growth, that line that goes through the green number, that's the range of forecast. you can see for the first quarter it's the largest, 3% to 1.5%. maybe lower if we get the sequester, payroll tax ends up worse than we thought. it's s
better when the economy is challenged, with head winds such as payroll tax cut, rising gasoline prices. then its competitors, now do you see it? >> we are seeing fewer dollars for everyone. it is showing up in lower income first. there are fewer shock absorbers there. less excess cash in the checking account. i think you will see it in the middle and upper income consumers coming. they just have the ability to absorb that income reduction in the near term more. i think we see a reduction in income and wal-mart's customer and immediately that translates to reduction of spending power. they may benefit down the road a little bit from trade down. but i think what we will see as this ripples across retail is the categories where people will be cutting back. >> i believe in one of my notes, and i think you said, that relatively wal-mart. relatives it pieres a wal-mart does better in a slow or challenged economy. but wal-mart, like others, does better when the economy is moving ahead, right? >> wal-mart would do better by far in a better wage growth. when things are tough, they do do better
the state of the economy, he probably should have lost and he won not just because of mitt romney's inadequacies, but because he built the finest political organization in recent american history with more than 1 million volunteers. >> you share that in common with barack obama. his hometown of chicago. your hometown is chicago. >> i met barack obama in 2002 and at that time he had just lost for the house of representatives. he told me when we first met when my aunt had died and he came over to pay respects to my cousin's house. he said he was going to run for the u.s. senate. i remember thinking, wow, that's a lot of nerve. he just lost for the house and he is running for the senate? yes, i knew him and i knew a lot of the people around him in chicago for many years because i grew up in chicago politics. my mother was a politician. my mother new barack obama in the '80s. so, you know, in some ways i'm familiar with the political environment that he came out of and i think that, you know, it's giving me a little bit more insight going back with these folks for quite a long period
attention. >> that's what the economy said, herman. >> those that are wrong economists. >> please be reasonable. >> it makes me ashamed. >> vent your anger but be alone when you do it. ♪ have you heard about the new dance criaze ♪ li . >> it is seven days to austerity, to a potential economic apock lips when $85 billion will be slashed from the federal government and eventually it will affect all of us from the food we eat to the flights we take to the nation's national security. all of it could come apart unless republicans find a way to compromise on sequestration. it's a message the president reiterated this afternoon while meeting with japan's prime minister. >> this should be a no-brainer, and let me just point out that the overall impact to the economy will be to slow down the recovery. >> the comments came after transportation secretary ray lahood visited the white house briefing room this morning and explained in no uncertain terms how these cuts will affect the average american. he detailed not only the delays that travelers within the united states can expect, but al
and a lot of damage to the economy. but because it's slower moving, there seems to be less impetus to get a deal done before the march 1st deadline. you're hearing maybe this would all be wrapped up and the continuing spending resolution, if that's not solved by the end of march could result in a government shutdown. there seems to be posturing for negotiating all at once, some time in march. looks like it's possible we'll go past the sequester. >> didn't the gop agree to the sequester deal? and if the gop wanted to stop it, they could have. how do you assess blaming the president for the sequester? >> i'm not sure that's really working out for them because it's true that both sides agreed to this. and now the president is saying, okay, i agreed to this but let's do something about it. the whole idea of the sequester is it would be such a bad thing that neither party would want to go through with it. we can disagree with the logic of even setting this up. but it is true that if you're the party that's refusing to do the negotiation, i think you're the one that looks bad. the fact that bot
when we were trying to save the economy, until this time. and now that we are finally stumbling back from the depths of recession, we are still trying to cut government jobs. look at this, more than 70,000 government workers were canned when the recession began. the government sent 9,000 government workers home with a final paycheck, good luck, officer, see you around. so chart imitates life. we lionize and celebrate the people who fix the math, and rescue us from fires. we lionize and celebrate them justly as we should. and then in record numbers we can them, hurting them and us as a country. not every public sector worker is going to win the medal of valor like those at the white house today. but there is reason to appreciate them, both in the heroic and in the specific, and in the aggregate, for what they do for us every day. that does it for us, we'll see you tomorrow night, now it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell. >>> john boehner now claims he had nothing to do with the dreaded sequester, even though he voted for it. even some republicans are not letting him
people have been coming from mexico. and part of that is the bad economy in the u.s. there's just fewer jobs. part of that is a good economy in mexico. part of it's our enforcement. and of course, drug cartels and the drug war in mexico have played a huge role. >> but james, republicans are going to have to talk about border security, border security, border security to sell the other part of this. we saw john mccain and jeff flake, the two senators from arizona, having to sort of go back and forth and back and forth and slowly move their constituents along. and the way they do that is by talking tough on the border. >> yes. and this is politics playing out. right after the election, even sean hannity said well, maybe i'm for some kind of a border thing. the people in the republican party voting in these republican primaries, they're not sold on this. and i think senator mccain found that when he went back to arizona. it's going to happen time and time again. and they do have to bring them along. >> it's going to be tough in louisiana, too, isn't it? >> very. >> mary landrieu. is mary,
're going to cut everything right now, sequestration. it's going to slow down the economy. you've got democrats -- you've got the president running around because he only knows how to do one thing, ask for higher taxes. he's leading with the taxes. we've got to raise more taxes. it's the rich, it's the corporations, tax, tax, tax. i thought we had this debate before. democrats don't seem to understand that taxing americans dampens the economy, hurts small businesses, hurts a lot of americans. republicans don't seem to understand that massive unfocused cuts right now are going to slow down the economy and hurt americans, too. >> you seriously have to wonder whether anyone in washington, in the house, in the senate, in the white house, in the administration, republican, democrat, do they ever go outdoors? do they ever see what happens every day to ordinary americans? people who have been getting crushed economically for the past 10 or 15 years are now getting crushed again, doubly so. the payroll tax has been eliminated. have you checked out the price of gasoline over the past couple of
're not necessary. they'll hurt our economy. they'll raise the unemployment rate. and the reason is because congress has not been able to compromise on a deficit reduction package that's more sensible. >> yesterday the president insisted sudden across-the-board spending cuts would be unnecessary and damaging and he made sure that first responders were there to punctuate the message. let's watch and listen. >> border patrol agents will see their hours reduced. fbi agents will be furloughed. federal prosecutors will have to close cases and let criminals go. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks, which means more delays at airports across the country. thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. >> and keeping up the drum beat, house minority leader nancy pelosi will hold hearings on how middle class families could be hurt by the spending cuts that could kick in march 1st. joining me is u.s. congressman adam shiff of california. i was so impressed by the way you explained all of this this morning on msnbc. i'd like you to do it again. your take on what this fight is ab
are employed, cut out 4% of the federal budget, that's going to have a big effect on the economy. >> the transportation secretary ray lahood spoke at the white house briefing today. all of you listen to this. >> there has to be some impact in order to save $1 billion. $1 billion is a lot of money. >> let's be clear, it's less than 2% of your budget -- >> it's a lot of money, jonathan. where i come from, which is central illinois, $1 billion is a lot of money. >> all right, john, jump in here. this is the tricky part, i think. $1 billion is a lot of money and i think daniel had a good point there. on the other hand, there are all sorts of businesses, all sorts of families, all sorts of states that have had to suck up bigger cuts and they haven't screamed that everything is falling apart at the hinges. is there political opportunism here? >> there's definitely political theater but this whole plan was supposed to be so stupid that it would compel the two parties to come together. the grant bargain but the parties can't seem to come together. what you're hearing is the washington mo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 175 (some duplicates have been removed)